President Trump fills world leaders with fear: ‘It’s gone from funny to really scary’

Most of the world seems to agree a Donald Trump presidency is a disturbing possibility that would inflict unthinkable damage, Guardian reporters found

Dangerous, foolish, irrational, scary, terrifying, irresponsible, a clown, a disaster. These are just some of the words used to describe the prospect of a Donald Trump presidency by politicians, diplomats and analysts around the world.

As the businessman gave his first major policy address since becoming frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination on Wednesday, Guardian correspondents in Washington and around the globe asked the international community whether it was prepared for the swaggering billionaire to occupy the White House.

Many said they still cannot believe the nation that elected its first black president just eight years ago will now rush to embrace a man who has offended Mexicans, Muslims and others. The possibility that Trump might actually win fills great swaths of the planet with dread with the apparent and notable exception of Vladimir Putins Russia with concerns over everything from trade to the nuclear trigger.

While Trump was delivering his speech in Washington, outlining a doctrine of naked self-interest that would shake the rust off Americas foreign policy, the heads of all the major UN agencies gathered in Vienna, Austria, for a strategy session with secretary general Ban Ki-moon, now in his last eight months in office.

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/apr/28/donald-trump-president-world-leaders-foreign-relations

Palestinian barber keeps alive memories of his father’s flight from Jaffa

Iskander Hinn has on display the old clippers and razors his father took with him when he fled home 68 years ago

In a cabinet at the back of Iskander Hinns barbershop in the West Bank city of Ramallah are a row of bone-handled cut-throat razors and, on the shelf below, a set of steel-sprung hand-operated clippers.

The tools speak of a previous era and of one moment in particular: the day in 1948 when Hinns father, a barber, fled the coastal city of Jaffa with the tools of his trade in the midst of the event Palestinians mark as the Nakba catastrophe that accompanied the creation of the state of Israel.

The flight or expulsion of more than 700,000 Arabs during Israels war of independence in 1947-49 is marked by Palestinians on Israeli Independence Day which fell on Thursday as well as officially each year on 15 May.

In Hinns barbershop, evidence of the Nakba is still unusually present even if his father did not like to talk to his children about his flight from Jaffa.

A valve radio that sits on top of his glass cabinet dates from 1936. Hinn bought it himself but it is exactly the same model as one his father had.

A wealthy barber who also rented out four Morris Eights from his shop on Jaffas King George Street, Habib Hinn took one of his cars, 3,000 Palestinian pounds in cash, and the tools of his trade and drove to Ramallah, believing he would return, perhaps within a week, when the violence had died down.

But the barber pictures of whom hang in the shop in Ramallah returned to Jaffa only once, to see where his shop had once been situated. That was 40 years later, in the same month that he died.

Hinn
Hinn in front of the cabinet where he keeps his fathers tools. Photograph: Peter Beaumont for the Guardian

He opened up a new shop in Ramallah, first in the Old Town, and then here in 1950 when he realised he wasnt going back and when he had spent most of the money he had brought with him, his son said.

Born after his father had fled to Ramallah, Hinn is intimate with the details. The shop was three doors wide with seven chairs for cutting hair, and his Morris Eights stood on the street outside.

We met on 12 May, the 68th anniversary of the day Jaffa fell to Israeli forces. He took what he could carry. Some of his money. The rest he buried under some old car wheels in a hole, Hinn said. The razors, clippers, a wooden coatstand and a chair his father took with him that day still survive in the Ramallah barbershop.

Others in the family fled to Jordan, Lebanon and further afield but, wanting to go to a place where he knew people, Habib Hinn settled on Ramallah. A customer, friend and neighbour had been Aziz Shehadeh, a lawyer from Ramallah, whose son is Raja Shehadeh, the feted Palestinian writer whose hair Hinn now cuts and who wrote about the family in his book The Sealed Room.

Hinn, who studied chemistry at university and makes his own hair products, joined the shop aged 18 and has worked there ever since.

Hinn
Hinn in his barber shop. Photograph: Peter Beaumont for the Guardian

My father talked only very rarely about the shop in Jaffa. And then one day in 1987 he said: Lets go and see the shop. We drove in the Fiat we had then.

It had been transformed into an antiques shop. They stopped to look on the other side of the street but did not make it across, they say, before the Israeli police appeared and told them not to go into the shop.

I suppose one of his old [Jewish] neighbours recognised him and called the police. For him it was the end.

This year Hinn found his fathers key. Many Palestinians keep the keys to their old family homes as a poignant symbol of what they lost as Israel was born and the demand for the right of return.

However, Hinns father had hidden his for reasons his son believes he understands. I was clearing out the furniture in his old bedroom. He had hidden it in the bottom of his closet. He had hidden it because he loved us. He didnt want us to feel the loss he had hidden all those years.

And because he was wise. I think he must have known that if I had seen it and heard about it when I was young, I might have ended up in jail.

He studied the key in his hand. It is a message, delivered at an age when we could understand it. It says that sometime in the future I can return. It will open the door. I will pass through. And no one can stop me.

Like many Palestinians whose families were displaced during the Nakba, Hinn said he could not see Jaffa as Israel but still as Palestine. He insisted he held no bitterness or animosity towards Israelis as individuals for who they are only for what he said Israeli policies had done to Palestinians.

He does not even rule out coexistence, but does not see any evidence that it is possible in the plausible future.

Putting his key aside, he added: What it says to me is personal. This is not about the Palestinian leadership or political factions. It is about my case.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/13/palestinian-barber-memories-fathers-flight-jaffa

Former Chilean military official found liable for killing of Victor Jara

Florida jury awards $28m in verdict that could lead to Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nuezs extradition to face criminal charges over 1973 killing of folk singer

A Florida jury on Monday found a former Chilean army officer liable for the 1973 torture and murder of the folk singer and political activist Victor Jara, awarding $28m in damages to his widow and daughters in one of the biggest and most significant legal human rights victories against a foreign war criminal in a US courtroom.

The verdict against Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nuez after a two-week civil trial in Orlandos federal court could now also pave the way for his extradition to face criminal murder charges in Chile related to his conduct during a CIA-backed coup that led to Augusto Pinochets 17-year military dictatorship and the deaths of almost 3,100 people.

Accusers said Barrientos, 67, who now lives in Deltona, Florida, shot dead Jara, 40, in September 1973 after three days of beatings while the socialist-leaning theatre director and university lecturer was among thousands of suspected communists and subversives detained in Santiagos soccer stadium.

Barrientos, who fled Chile in 1989 and became a US citizen through marriage, was one of nine retired army officers indicted for murder in his homeland four years ago but the US Department of Justice has not responded to a request by the Chilean government for his return.

Kathy Roberts, legal director of the Center for Justice and Accountability, the California-based human rights group that brought the civil action on behalf of Jaras British-born widow, Joan Turner Jara, and daughters Amanda Turner Jara and Manuela Bunster, believes the Florida jurys ruling could now increase the pressure on the DoJ.

Its a step on the path towards justice for our clients and for Victor but also for the many other families who lost someone at Chile Stadium so many years ago, she said after the verdict.

We presented evidence that started to shed light on what happened there, and we hope that process will continue in Chile and we hope that the United States will extradite Mr Barrientos to face justice in the country where he committed these crimes.

Joan Jara Turner, 88, testified during the trial that her husbands death in a stadium locker room had cut my life in two, and has previously spoken of the horror of having to identify his tortured and mutilated body in a morgue after he was dumped outside the stadium with 44 bullet wounds.

[Im] happy in a sense that what we were trying to do for more than 40 years, for Victor, has today come true, she said through tears on the steps if the Orlando courthouse.

Its the beginning of justice for all those people, those relatives in Chile who are waiting to learn the fate of their loved ones, who have been for years and years, just like us, seeking justice [and] knowledge.

Its been a long journey. For Victor, art and social justice were one and the same. His songs continue to be sung today and inspire both artists and those who seek social justice.

Daughter Amanda Turner Jara, who thanked lawyers from the CJA and pro bono counsel from New York legal firm Chadbourne & Parke, said it was crucial that Barrientos was extradited.

He ran away. Hes been hiding here for so long, and its time he faces that now in Chile, she said.

The jury of five women and one man deliberated for nine hours before determining that Barrientos, a Pinochet loyalist who commanded the Chilean armys notorious Tejas Verde brigade, should pay $6m in compensatory damages and a further $22m in punitive damages. The jury found him liable on both counts of the civil indictment, for torture and extrajudicial killing.

The Jara family, however, are unlikely to see any payment. Barrientos lawyer Luis Calderon painted a picture during the trial of a poor retiree who lives in a modest two-bedroom house and drives around in a decade-old car, and who was forced to work as a cook at a fast-food restaurant for years just to make ends meet.

Barrientos, who remained impassive as the verdicts were read, did not comment afterwards but Calderon said he was disappointed. We will explore all our options regarding an appeal, he said.

Dixon Osburn, executive director of the CJA, told the Guardian that one of the biggest challenges was proving that Barrientos, who also worked for a time as a landscaper during almost three decades in the US, was the same violent army officer who beat, tortured and shot Jara.

These cases are always difficult because a lot of time has passed and because of the silence that has encased this matter for so long, he said. Trying to break through that silence and lift the veil on what happened in those days was enormously difficult.

One of the things the Jara family has been pursuing for 43 years is just the truth. Barrientos said in deposition he knew nothing of Chile Stadium, he knew nothing of Victor Jara, but we had conscript after conscript saying he was there and he was responsible for what took place.

One of the conscripts, Jose Navarette Barra, said during the trial in video testimony from Chile that Barrientos boasted of what he had done. He said many times that he killed Victor Jara, Barra said. He talked about killing a communist, and he didnt want a communist in Chile.

The ruling marks the latest victory in the CJAs pursuit of overseas war criminals and human rights abusers living in Florida. In August 2015, El Salvadors former defence minister Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova was extradited to El Salvador after a lengthy legal battle. Vides, an army general in the country during the bloody civil war in the 1980s, was accused of covering up a number of atrocities, including the rape and murder of four American churchwomen.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/27/victor-jara-pedro-pablo-barrientos-nunez-killing-chile

Syria: Aleppo hospital hit by barrel bombs and cluster bombs, reports say

Crucial facility in rebel-held district had already been bombed earlier in week in an assault described by UN chief as war crime

The largest hospital in the rebel-held side of Aleppo has been devastated by barrel bombs, witnesses have said, as forces loyal to the Russia -backed government intensified their assault on the area with a major weekend offensive.

The crucial facility, known as M10, had already been put out of service before the latest attack, having suffered a heavy bombardment three days earlier, in an assault that the UN chief, Ban Ki-moon, denounced as a war crime.

With M10 and the second-largest hospital in the eastern part of the city now both out of use, only six operational hospitals remain in the region, according to the Syrian American Medical Society (Sams).

Two barrel bombs hit the M10 hospital and there were reports of a cluster bomb as well, Adham Sahloul of Sams said.

The recent surge in attacks in Aleppo from forces loyal to the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad, have been some of the worst in the countrys five-year civil war . More than 220 people have died and residential buildings have been reduced to heaps of rubble.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/01/-syriaairstrikes-major-offensive-against-rebel-held-areas-of-aleppo

Canadian great-grandmother, 80, wins $50m lottery: ‘I’m too old for this’

Lois Olsen, who has lived in a small farming village in Alberta for about 50 years, planned to buy a new car with money she said would have been useful years ago

It wasnt until the late 1960s when Lois Olsen moved into a newly built house in her small farming village in Alberta, Canada that she got her first taste of life with indoor plumbing. I thought I was in heaven, I had running water and I had a telephone, she recalled.

So when the 80-year-old found out earlier this month that she had won C$50m in the lottery, she was stumped for ideas on what she might do with all the money. For my family, its going to help them out a lot, she said. For me, Im too old for this. I would have liked to have won this 20 or 30 years ago.

Olsen, who is a great-grandmother, learned of the windfall during a grocery run at her local supermarket. A brief stop to check her lottery ticket in the self-checking machines suggested she had won $15. I pulled it out, put it back in. It looked like $500, Olsen told reporters this week as she accepted her big cheque. I said to the girl, Theres something wrong with this machine.

An employee came over to help. She says, No you just won $50m. Speechless, Olsen started shaking. I just grabbed my groceries and left.

The news travelled fast in her central Alberta village of Irma, home to about 450 people. I dodged the media once there, she said, laughing as she described watching an out-of-town TV crew ask locals at an event about the big lottery winner. They didnt say anything, so I was able to escape home without anything.

She has few plans for the money, save for helping out her three children, nine grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. For her, the money comes too late to make a big difference, she said.

I milked cows for I dont know how many years by hand, then we finally got a milking machine, she said. We milked cows for about 25 years. We had a bunch of pigs, we had range cattle, I raised chickens, turkeys; I had everything. A lot of hard work.

When pressed by reporters, she said she might replace her 11-year-old car. I think Ill buy an SUV, something a little higher for me to get in and out of, she said. That will be the big purchase.

Beyond that, she said little else would change. Money doesnt mean a whole bunch to me. I had hard times, she said. With a laugh, she added, Maybe not now.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/01/canada-great-grandmother-lottery-lois-olsen

Israel MP benefited from controversial law on illegal Jewish outposts

Activists say Bezalel Smotrich of Jewish Home party lives in one of houses recently legalised by countrys parliament

A far-right Israeli MP who backed a controversial law retroactively legalising illegal Jewish outposts built on privately-owned Palestinian land will personally benefit from the legislation, because his home is one of several thousand covered by the provision, activists have revealed.

Bezalel Smotrich, who represents the Jewish Home party, praised the passage of the law in early February as a historic day for the settlement movement and for Israel.

He did not mention at the time that it would potentially also benefit him, by changing the status of his own home in the settlement of Kedumim. He is reportedly one of the least wealthy members of parliament, with a 15 year-old car, around 30,000 in savings and a house worth just over 200,000.

There are around 150 homes built illegally on private land (in Kedumin), as well as public facilities including road infrastructure, said Dror Etkes, director of the Kerem Navot NGO which focuses on land issues. Smotrichs house is one of them.

The so-called regulation bill passed at the start of February, retroactively legalises the construction of thousands of Jewish settler homes on privately owned Palestinian land. The original landowners are to be compensated either with money or alternative land, even if they do not agree to give up their property.

The international community deems all settlements illegal, but Israeli law distinguishes between the construction of homes on areas that the government deems state land, which are legal, and building projects on land owned privately by Palestinians.

map showing Bezalel Smotrich’s house

A string of court cases in recent years has forced the government to demolish some homes built on private Palestinian land, including nine in a settlement called Ofra this week. The bill effectively removes the threat hanging over other similar homes.

The new law has been dubbed a theft and land grab by opponents, and condemned by the international community including the new UN secretary general, Antonio Guterres. It was even slammed by Israeli right wingers like former Likud Minister Dan Meridor, who called it evil and dangerous.

Palestinian councils and human rights organisations have launched a legal challenge that is expected to have a strong chance of success.

Kedumim was mapped by Israels Civil Administration several years ago, and data provided by Etkes shows Smotrichs home is part of an enclave clearly outside the settlements boundaries.

Aerial photographs show land there was being cultivated from the 1970s to the 1990s, one measure the Israeli government uses to assess Palestinian ownership. Construction on homes began in the early 2000s.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/02/israel-mp-benefited-from-controversial-law-on-illegal-jewish-outposts

President Trump fills world leaders with fear: ‘It’s gone from funny to really scary’

Most of the world seems to agree a Donald Trump presidency is a disturbing possibility that would inflict unthinkable damage, Guardian reporters found

Dangerous, foolish, irrational, scary, terrifying, irresponsible, a clown, a disaster. These are just some of the words used to describe the prospect of a Donald Trump presidency by politicians, diplomats and analysts around the world.

As the businessman gave his first major policy address since becoming frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination on Wednesday, Guardian correspondents in Washington and around the globe asked the international community whether it was prepared for the swaggering billionaire to occupy the White House.

Many said they still cannot believe the nation that elected its first black president just eight years ago will now rush to embrace a man who has offended Mexicans, Muslims and others. The possibility that Trump might actually win fills great swaths of the planet with dread with the apparent and notable exception of Vladimir Putins Russia with concerns over everything from trade to the nuclear trigger.

While Trump was delivering his speech in Washington, outlining a doctrine of naked self-interest that would shake the rust off Americas foreign policy, the heads of all the major UN agencies gathered in Vienna, Austria, for a strategy session with secretary general Ban Ki-moon, now in his last eight months in office.

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/apr/28/donald-trump-president-world-leaders-foreign-relations

Palestinian barber keeps alive memories of his father’s flight from Jaffa

Iskander Hinn has on display the old clippers and razors his father took with him when he fled home 68 years ago

In a cabinet at the back of Iskander Hinns barbershop in the West Bank city of Ramallah are a row of bone-handled cut-throat razors and, on the shelf below, a set of steel-sprung hand-operated clippers.

The tools speak of a previous era and of one moment in particular: the day in 1948 when Hinns father, a barber, fled the coastal city of Jaffa with the tools of his trade in the midst of the event Palestinians mark as the Nakba catastrophe that accompanied the creation of the state of Israel.

The flight or expulsion of more than 700,000 Arabs during Israels war of independence in 1947-49 is marked by Palestinians on Israeli Independence Day which fell on Thursday as well as officially each year on 15 May.

In Hinns barbershop, evidence of the Nakba is still unusually present even if his father did not like to talk to his children about his flight from Jaffa.

A valve radio that sits on top of his glass cabinet dates from 1936. Hinn bought it himself but it is exactly the same model as one his father had.

A wealthy barber who also rented out four Morris Eights from his shop on Jaffas King George Street, Habib Hinn took one of his cars, 3,000 Palestinian pounds in cash, and the tools of his trade and drove to Ramallah, believing he would return, perhaps within a week, when the violence had died down.

But the barber pictures of whom hang in the shop in Ramallah returned to Jaffa only once, to see where his shop had once been situated. That was 40 years later, in the same month that he died.

Hinn
Hinn in front of the cabinet where he keeps his fathers tools. Photograph: Peter Beaumont for the Guardian

He opened up a new shop in Ramallah, first in the Old Town, and then here in 1950 when he realised he wasnt going back and when he had spent most of the money he had brought with him, his son said.

Born after his father had fled to Ramallah, Hinn is intimate with the details. The shop was three doors wide with seven chairs for cutting hair, and his Morris Eights stood on the street outside.

We met on 12 May, the 68th anniversary of the day Jaffa fell to Israeli forces. He took what he could carry. Some of his money. The rest he buried under some old car wheels in a hole, Hinn said. The razors, clippers, a wooden coatstand and a chair his father took with him that day still survive in the Ramallah barbershop.

Others in the family fled to Jordan, Lebanon and further afield but, wanting to go to a place where he knew people, Habib Hinn settled on Ramallah. A customer, friend and neighbour had been Aziz Shehadeh, a lawyer from Ramallah, whose son is Raja Shehadeh, the feted Palestinian writer whose hair Hinn now cuts and who wrote about the family in his book The Sealed Room.

Hinn, who studied chemistry at university and makes his own hair products, joined the shop aged 18 and has worked there ever since.

Hinn
Hinn in his barber shop. Photograph: Peter Beaumont for the Guardian

My father talked only very rarely about the shop in Jaffa. And then one day in 1987 he said: Lets go and see the shop. We drove in the Fiat we had then.

It had been transformed into an antiques shop. They stopped to look on the other side of the street but did not make it across, they say, before the Israeli police appeared and told them not to go into the shop.

I suppose one of his old [Jewish] neighbours recognised him and called the police. For him it was the end.

This year Hinn found his fathers key. Many Palestinians keep the keys to their old family homes as a poignant symbol of what they lost as Israel was born and the demand for the right of return.

However, Hinns father had hidden his for reasons his son believes he understands. I was clearing out the furniture in his old bedroom. He had hidden it in the bottom of his closet. He had hidden it because he loved us. He didnt want us to feel the loss he had hidden all those years.

And because he was wise. I think he must have known that if I had seen it and heard about it when I was young, I might have ended up in jail.

He studied the key in his hand. It is a message, delivered at an age when we could understand it. It says that sometime in the future I can return. It will open the door. I will pass through. And no one can stop me.

Like many Palestinians whose families were displaced during the Nakba, Hinn said he could not see Jaffa as Israel but still as Palestine. He insisted he held no bitterness or animosity towards Israelis as individuals for who they are only for what he said Israeli policies had done to Palestinians.

He does not even rule out coexistence, but does not see any evidence that it is possible in the plausible future.

Putting his key aside, he added: What it says to me is personal. This is not about the Palestinian leadership or political factions. It is about my case.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/13/palestinian-barber-memories-fathers-flight-jaffa

Former Chilean military official found liable for killing of Victor Jara

Florida jury awards $28m in verdict that could lead to Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nuezs extradition to face criminal charges over 1973 killing of folk singer

A Florida jury on Monday found a former Chilean army officer liable for the 1973 torture and murder of the folk singer and political activist Victor Jara, awarding $28m in damages to his widow and daughters in one of the biggest and most significant legal human rights victories against a foreign war criminal in a US courtroom.

The verdict against Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nuez after a two-week civil trial in Orlandos federal court could now also pave the way for his extradition to face criminal murder charges in Chile related to his conduct during a CIA-backed coup that led to Augusto Pinochets 17-year military dictatorship and the deaths of almost 3,100 people.

Accusers said Barrientos, 67, who now lives in Deltona, Florida, shot dead Jara, 40, in September 1973 after three days of beatings while the socialist-leaning theatre director and university lecturer was among thousands of suspected communists and subversives detained in Santiagos soccer stadium.

Barrientos, who fled Chile in 1989 and became a US citizen through marriage, was one of nine retired army officers indicted for murder in his homeland four years ago but the US Department of Justice has not responded to a request by the Chilean government for his return.

Kathy Roberts, legal director of the Center for Justice and Accountability, the California-based human rights group that brought the civil action on behalf of Jaras British-born widow, Joan Turner Jara, and daughters Amanda Turner Jara and Manuela Bunster, believes the Florida jurys ruling could now increase the pressure on the DoJ.

Its a step on the path towards justice for our clients and for Victor but also for the many other families who lost someone at Chile Stadium so many years ago, she said after the verdict.

We presented evidence that started to shed light on what happened there, and we hope that process will continue in Chile and we hope that the United States will extradite Mr Barrientos to face justice in the country where he committed these crimes.

Joan Jara Turner, 88, testified during the trial that her husbands death in a stadium locker room had cut my life in two, and has previously spoken of the horror of having to identify his tortured and mutilated body in a morgue after he was dumped outside the stadium with 44 bullet wounds.

[Im] happy in a sense that what we were trying to do for more than 40 years, for Victor, has today come true, she said through tears on the steps if the Orlando courthouse.

Its the beginning of justice for all those people, those relatives in Chile who are waiting to learn the fate of their loved ones, who have been for years and years, just like us, seeking justice [and] knowledge.

Its been a long journey. For Victor, art and social justice were one and the same. His songs continue to be sung today and inspire both artists and those who seek social justice.

Daughter Amanda Turner Jara, who thanked lawyers from the CJA and pro bono counsel from New York legal firm Chadbourne & Parke, said it was crucial that Barrientos was extradited.

He ran away. Hes been hiding here for so long, and its time he faces that now in Chile, she said.

The jury of five women and one man deliberated for nine hours before determining that Barrientos, a Pinochet loyalist who commanded the Chilean armys notorious Tejas Verde brigade, should pay $6m in compensatory damages and a further $22m in punitive damages. The jury found him liable on both counts of the civil indictment, for torture and extrajudicial killing.

The Jara family, however, are unlikely to see any payment. Barrientos lawyer Luis Calderon painted a picture during the trial of a poor retiree who lives in a modest two-bedroom house and drives around in a decade-old car, and who was forced to work as a cook at a fast-food restaurant for years just to make ends meet.

Barrientos, who remained impassive as the verdicts were read, did not comment afterwards but Calderon said he was disappointed. We will explore all our options regarding an appeal, he said.

Dixon Osburn, executive director of the CJA, told the Guardian that one of the biggest challenges was proving that Barrientos, who also worked for a time as a landscaper during almost three decades in the US, was the same violent army officer who beat, tortured and shot Jara.

These cases are always difficult because a lot of time has passed and because of the silence that has encased this matter for so long, he said. Trying to break through that silence and lift the veil on what happened in those days was enormously difficult.

One of the things the Jara family has been pursuing for 43 years is just the truth. Barrientos said in deposition he knew nothing of Chile Stadium, he knew nothing of Victor Jara, but we had conscript after conscript saying he was there and he was responsible for what took place.

One of the conscripts, Jose Navarette Barra, said during the trial in video testimony from Chile that Barrientos boasted of what he had done. He said many times that he killed Victor Jara, Barra said. He talked about killing a communist, and he didnt want a communist in Chile.

The ruling marks the latest victory in the CJAs pursuit of overseas war criminals and human rights abusers living in Florida. In August 2015, El Salvadors former defence minister Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova was extradited to El Salvador after a lengthy legal battle. Vides, an army general in the country during the bloody civil war in the 1980s, was accused of covering up a number of atrocities, including the rape and murder of four American churchwomen.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/27/victor-jara-pedro-pablo-barrientos-nunez-killing-chile

Former Chilean military official found liable for killing of Victor Jara

Florida jury awards $28m in verdict that could lead to Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nuezs extradition to face criminal charges over 1973 killing of folk singer

A Florida jury on Monday found a former Chilean army officer liable for the 1973 torture and murder of the folk singer and political activist Victor Jara, awarding $28m in damages to his widow and daughters in one of the biggest and most significant legal human rights victories against a foreign war criminal in a US courtroom.

The verdict against Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nuez after a two-week civil trial in Orlandos federal court could now also pave the way for his extradition to face criminal murder charges in Chile related to his conduct during a CIA-backed coup that led to Augusto Pinochets 17-year military dictatorship and the deaths of almost 3,100 people.

Accusers said Barrientos, 67, who now lives in Deltona, Florida, shot dead Jara, 40, in September 1973 after three days of beatings while the socialist-leaning theatre director and university lecturer was among thousands of suspected communists and subversives detained in Santiagos soccer stadium.

Barrientos, who fled Chile in 1989 and became a US citizen through marriage, was one of nine retired army officers indicted for murder in his homeland four years ago but the US Department of Justice has not responded to a request by the Chilean government for his return.

Kathy Roberts, legal director of the Center for Justice and Accountability, the California-based human rights group that brought the civil action on behalf of Jaras British-born widow, Joan Turner Jara, and daughters Amanda Turner Jara and Manuela Bunster, believes the Florida jurys ruling could now increase the pressure on the DoJ.

Its a step on the path towards justice for our clients and for Victor but also for the many other families who lost someone at Chile Stadium so many years ago, she said after the verdict.

We presented evidence that started to shed light on what happened there, and we hope that process will continue in Chile and we hope that the United States will extradite Mr Barrientos to face justice in the country where he committed these crimes.

Joan Jara Turner, 88, testified during the trial that her husbands death in a stadium locker room had cut my life in two, and has previously spoken of the horror of having to identify his tortured and mutilated body in a morgue after he was dumped outside the stadium with 44 bullet wounds.

[Im] happy in a sense that what we were trying to do for more than 40 years, for Victor, has today come true, she said through tears on the steps if the Orlando courthouse.

Its the beginning of justice for all those people, those relatives in Chile who are waiting to learn the fate of their loved ones, who have been for years and years, just like us, seeking justice [and] knowledge.

Its been a long journey. For Victor, art and social justice were one and the same. His songs continue to be sung today and inspire both artists and those who seek social justice.

Daughter Amanda Turner Jara, who thanked lawyers from the CJA and pro bono counsel from New York legal firm Chadbourne & Parke, said it was crucial that Barrientos was extradited.

He ran away. Hes been hiding here for so long, and its time he faces that now in Chile, she said.

The jury of five women and one man deliberated for nine hours before determining that Barrientos, a Pinochet loyalist who commanded the Chilean armys notorious Tejas Verde brigade, should pay $6m in compensatory damages and a further $22m in punitive damages. The jury found him liable on both counts of the civil indictment, for torture and extrajudicial killing.

The Jara family, however, are unlikely to see any payment. Barrientos lawyer Luis Calderon painted a picture during the trial of a poor retiree who lives in a modest two-bedroom house and drives around in a decade-old car, and who was forced to work as a cook at a fast-food restaurant for years just to make ends meet.

Barrientos, who remained impassive as the verdicts were read, did not comment afterwards but Calderon said he was disappointed. We will explore all our options regarding an appeal, he said.

Dixon Osburn, executive director of the CJA, told the Guardian that one of the biggest challenges was proving that Barrientos, who also worked for a time as a landscaper during almost three decades in the US, was the same violent army officer who beat, tortured and shot Jara.

These cases are always difficult because a lot of time has passed and because of the silence that has encased this matter for so long, he said. Trying to break through that silence and lift the veil on what happened in those days was enormously difficult.

One of the things the Jara family has been pursuing for 43 years is just the truth. Barrientos said in deposition he knew nothing of Chile Stadium, he knew nothing of Victor Jara, but we had conscript after conscript saying he was there and he was responsible for what took place.

One of the conscripts, Jose Navarette Barra, said during the trial in video testimony from Chile that Barrientos boasted of what he had done. He said many times that he killed Victor Jara, Barra said. He talked about killing a communist, and he didnt want a communist in Chile.

The ruling marks the latest victory in the CJAs pursuit of overseas war criminals and human rights abusers living in Florida. In August 2015, El Salvadors former defence minister Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova was extradited to El Salvador after a lengthy legal battle. Vides, an army general in the country during the bloody civil war in the 1980s, was accused of covering up a number of atrocities, including the rape and murder of four American churchwomen.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/27/victor-jara-pedro-pablo-barrientos-nunez-killing-chile